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/7VCTS, QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 

ABOUT SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 

DOCUMENTS 

APR 2 8 1975 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC ClBMHsjf 



AIRPORTS COMMISSION 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 
INTRODUCTION TO SAN FRANCISCO 
INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 





JOSEPH L. ALIOTO 

Mayor of San Francisco 

The Airports Commission, City and County of San Francisco, operates 
San Francisco International Airport as a public service enterprise for 
residents and visitors of the Greater San Francisco Bay Area, Northern 
California, Southern Oregon and Western Nevada, as well as travelers 
between the continental United States and the Far East, other Pacific 
lands, and other World Cities. 

Many Airport services are maintained around the clock to assist 
travelers. Passenger conveniences include nurseries for small children, an 
outstanding USO lounge for Armed Forces personnel, banks, foreign 
money exchange, baggage lockers, U.S. Postal Office, a duty free shop 
and a new 24 hour medical clinic staffed with 6 doctors. Travelers Aid 
Society is available without cost to assist those in need, as are many 
other important facilities designed to serve the public. 

Airporter coaches, taxis, limousines, Greyhound Bus, helicopters and 
third level air carriers provide service to and from downtown San 
Francisco and Bay Area cities. For private autos, SFIA provides some 
5,500 public parking spaces, including close-in garage parking, valet 
parking, convenient low price lots for long term parking and a free 
shuttle bus to all airport parking. 

San Francisco International Airport is served by 23 scheduled airlines 
with service ranging from local bay area helicopter service to world- 
wide passenger and cargo service on international routes. The air lanes 
between San Francisco and Los Angeles are the most heavily traveled in 
the world. Scheduled commuter airlines offer service to more than 30 
Northern California cities. 

The Airports Commission welcomes you to San Francisco International 
Airport — America's air gateway to the World and to the city preferred 
by most Americans. 




AIRPORTS COMMISSION 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Left to Right: Joseph P. Mazzola, Wallace R. Lynn, 
William K. Coblentz, William H. Chester, and 
William E. McDonnell, President. 



1X1 



SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1223 04180 0542 



HOW DOES SFIA OPERATE FINANCIALLY 

WITHOUT BECOMING AN ADDITIONAL TAX BURDEN? 



FISCAL OPERATIONS AND POLICIES AT SFIA. 



San Francisco International Airport operates on a 
completely self-sustaining basis. 1974 marks the 18th 
consecutive year in which all operations expenditures 
and debt service costs were paid solely out of airport 
revenues. 



are based on a 




ledule which in- 



SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

REFERENCE 
BOOK 



Not to be taken from the Library 



of utilities and 



ces 



iram and policies 
' $50 million in 
orn out facilities, 
nprovements. 




Fiscal operations have been a paramount factor in 
formulating the financial feasibility plan for further 
development and expansion of the Airport necessary 
to meet increased public demand for air transporta- 
tion. 

In addition to the $98 million general obligation 
bond issue approved by San Francisco voters in 1967 
(to be fully repaid from Airport revenues), additional 
funds to finance the construction of facilities will be 
provided from the sale of Airport Revenue Bonds, 
appropriations from Airport revenues, and federal 
aid. 

Approximately $280 million in revenue bonds will be 
needed through 1981 to meet the balance of capital 
fund requirements associated with the Airport Pro- 
gram. Airport revenues, federal aid and interest on 
uncommitted funds will provide the remaining dollars 
required to supplement the proposed program. 

Based upon detailed studies and analyses, the pro- 
posed Development Program has been found to be 
financially feasible, through the generation of Airport 
revenues alone. 



FISCAL YEAR 
1973 - 74 




SAN FRANCISCO AIRPORTS 
COMMISSION 



SAN FRANCISCO AIRPORTS 
COMMISSION 



WHERE THE MONEY COMES FROM 



WHERE THE MONEY GOES 



SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1223 04180 



0542 



HOW DOES SFIA OPERATE FINANCIALLY 

WITHOUT BECOMING AN ADDITIONAL TAX BURDEN? 



FISCAL OPERATIONS AND POLICIES AT SFIA. 



San Francisco International Airport operates on a 
completely self-sustaining basis. 1974 marks the 18th 
consecutive year in which all operations expenditures 
and debt service costs were paid solely out of airport 
revenues. 

Continued self-sufficient operations are based on a 
sound airport operating revenue schedule which in- 
cludes: 

• Airline user fees (Landing fees) 

• Concession fees 

• Terminal Rental Fees 

• Ground rentals 

• Fees and charges from the sale of utilities and 
other services 

• Other miscellaneous revenue sources 

Since 1957, the Airport's fiscal program and policies 
have enabled SFIA to invest over $50 million in 
reconstruction and replacement of worn out facilities, 
equipment replacement and capital improvements. 



Fiscal operations have been a paramount factor in 
formulating the financial feasibility plan for further 
development and expansion of the Airport necessary 
to meet increased public demand for air transporta- 
tion. 

In addition to the $98 million general obligation 
bond issue approved by San Francisco voters in 1967 
(to be fully repaid from Airport revenues), additional 
funds to finance the construction of facilities will be 
provided from the sale of Airport Revenue Bonds, 
appropriations from Airport revenues, and federal 
aid. 

Approximately $280 million in revenue bonds will be 
needed through 1981 to meet the balance of capital 
fund requirements associated with the Airport Pro- 
gram. Airport revenues, federal aid and interest on 
uncommitted funds will provide the remaining dollars 
required to supplement the proposed program. 

Based upon detailed studies and analyses, the pro- 
posed Development Program has been found to be 
financially feasible, through the generation of Airport 
revenues alone. 




FISCAL YEAR 
1973 - 74 




SAN FRANCISCO AIRPORTS 
COMMISSION 



SAN FRANCISCO AIRPORTS 
COMMISSION 



WHERE THE MONEY COMES FROM 



WHERE THE MONEY GOES 



THE GROWTH OF SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT IN 
PASSENGER AND CARGO IN THE PAST DECADE 



PASSENGER TRAFFIC AT 

SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 

Following a levelling period during 1970-71, an im- 
provement in the national economy returned passen- 
ger and cargo figures to an upward trend, with all 
time highs recorded at SFIA during 1973-74. All 
indicators point to future years showing even greater 
increases. 

Q WILL AN INCREASE IN PASSENGER TRAFFIC 
RESULT IN MORE NOISE AND SMOKE POLLU- 
TION? 

A The general increase in passenger traffic over the 
last half dozen years has been handled with a 
decrease in scheduled aircraft movements. This is 
good news for our environment. Resulting from 
the introduction and increased use of wide-bodied 
jets, which are substantially quieter and smoke- 
free, this favorable trend will continue as new 
aircraft replace the old, noisier jets. The older 
planes not only carry fewer passengers, they also 
produce more objectionable noise and smoke pol- 
lution. 

Reviewing the past dozen years shows that passen- 
ger traffic at SFIA has tripled, while scheduled 
aircraft movements have declined for six consecu- 
tive years, and in 1973-74 are actually the lowest 
since 1967-68. This trend will continue at the 
present level. 

Concern for our environment requires that future 
increases in the numbers of passengers through San 
Francisco International Airport should be handled 
through the ability of the airlines to carry more 
people on fewer flights. It is obvious that public 
demand for airline transportation will continue to 
grow steadily. The need to modernize and develop 
the present outmoded SFIA terminal complex has 
never been more clearly demonstrated than by 
these charts. 



AIRCRAFT MOVEMENTS 




100 150 200 250 300 350 400 
SCHEDULED AIRLINES ALL OTHER 



PASSENGER FLOW 




TOTAL AIR CARGO now approaching an annual 
billion pounds, reached a record high of 950 million 
pounds in 1973-74. This was due entirely to air 
freight. Air express declined because of cost factors 



with shippers getting rapid delivery at the lower 
freight rates. The ten-year picture shows air cargo has 
quadrupled in that period. 



3 1223 04180 0542 
S.F. PUBUC LIBRARY 



D REF 387.736 F1198 



HISTORY AND LITTLE KNOWN FACTS ABOUT 
SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 



What is now the San Francisco International Airport 
began operations in 1927 on 155 acres of leased land 
with a 1700 ft. graded dirt landing strip as its runway. 
Since then, the City and County of San Francisco and 
the airport tenants have invested over $300 million in 
meeting the ever-changing needs of air transportation. 
Prior to 1970 the airport operated as a department of 
the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission. 

In January 1970, Mayor Joseph L. Alioto proposed a 
charter amendment establishing a separate Airports 
Commission to the People of the City and County of 
San Francisco. The voters approved the amendment 
and the Airports Commission was established in 
September 1970. 



Facts, questi 
answers about 
[ 1975? ] 



ons and 
San 




By the charter, the Airports Commission is empow- 
ered to utilize revenue bonds, thus providing a wider 
base for financing and a new basis for planning and 
development of the airport. One of the first acts of 
the Airports Commission was to require the airport 
staff to prepare an updated analysis of future airport 
requirements to meet an obvious upswing in air 
passenger traffic. In December 1972 the Airports 
Commission adopted the current development pro- 
gram designed to modernize and renovate air terminal 
facilities through 1985. 

1. SFIA is situated on 5200 acres, of which approxi- 
mately 2500 are under water. SFIA is land limited. 
Development is restricted to the existing acreage. 

2. The airport is staffed by approximately 500 city 
employees. It is host to 1 18 tenants, including the 
airlines, who employ a force of approximately 
35,000 people. 

The terminal complex, including the buildings, the 
concourses, piers, gate areas, parking garage, totals 
over 1,500,000 square feet of floor area which 
must be maintained by the airport custodial de- 
partment. 




Airfield area includes runways, taxi-ways, aprons 
and gate positions along the adjacent areas within 
the clearance limits. 

3. The total paved area is 2,650,000 square yards or 
roughly the equivalent of 200 miles of two-lane 
highway. There are 18 miles of roadway and over 
300,000 square years of vehicle parking areas to be 
maintained. Also, 65 miles of primary cables in the 
airfield lighting system must be maintained in an 
operable condition 24 hours a day. 

4. The domestic water system at the airport consists 
of 13 miles of mains, including valves, hydrants, 
meters, emergency storage and emergency pumps, 
operating 24 hours a day. 

5. The sanitary sewage system consists of 12 miles of 
sewers, 20 sewage pumping stations, and a 2.75 
million gallons per day capacity water quality 
control plant which functions around the clock. 

6. The industrial waste water drainage system consists 
of 45 miles of drain lines and five major pumping 
stations with 1,000 catch basins and drainage 
inlets. 

7. The electrical distribution system includes 80 miles 
of single conduit primary distribution system, 12 
kilovolt and 4 kilovolt, high voltage, 31 substa- 
tions, switch gear and 420 meters. 

8. During fiscal year 1973-74, SFIA processed 17.1 
million passengers at an average rate of some 
46,000 passengers daily. Indicators for the forsee- 
able future point to the annual passenger volume 
to continue to increase, while the number of 
scheduled airline operations will level off or de- 
cline. 



SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 
AND THE ENVIRONMENT 



A major responsibility of airport management today is to explain the airport — its services, potential and needs — to 
neighboring communities. In recent years, concern for the effect of noise and air pollution on our environment has 
become a major issue, requiring San Francisco's Director of Airports to devote a considerable amount of time and effort in 
minimizing the effect of airport operations on our neighbors on the San Francisco Peninsula. 

Sharing this concern, the Director of Airports interfaces with residents of neighboring communities and those who espouse 
the causes of conservation and ecology, attempting to satisfy conflicting expectations and demands of diverse and 
powerful systems while maintaining the viability of the airport. The Director of Airports is at the center of the problem, 
the causes and solutions of which lie largely beyond his influence and control, yet which have a serious impact on 
operations and planning at San Francisco International. 

The Federal Aviation Administration certifies aircraft for flight, including approval of engine noise levels. Airlines 
formulate schedules and pilots determine the actual operation and flight paths of aircraft within FAA regulations. A San 
Mateo County Commission is responsible for land zoning around the Airport. The courses of action open to the Director 
of Airports are limited and largely deal with public relations, noise abatement programs and presentations at hearings. 

Tracor Sciences and Systems of Austin, Texas, a leading firm in the field of Aircraft Noise Monitoring Systems, was 
selected to provide San Francisco International Airport with the latest generation of equipment to monitor aircraft noise 
at specified ground locations under the flight patterns of arriving and departing aircraft. Tracor Sciences provided a similar 
system for another airport which has been highly reliable and accurate in providing aircraft noise data. 

Installation of an integrated aircraft noise monitoring system at San Francisco International is required to comply with 
noise measurement standards imposed by California Noise Standards under Title 4, California Administrative Code, 
Department of Aeronautics, Section 5012.L.C. 

The San Francisco International Airport Noise Monitoring System includes 13 remote noise monitoring terminals located 
in the cities of Brisbane, South San Francisco, San Bruno, Millbrae, Burlingame, Hillsborough and Foster City. Aircraft 
noise information is automatically fed into a digital computer for recording and read out, interfacing with an aircraft and 
tower sub-system to record and play back communications and time of day data. A weather monitor capability is included 
to assist the Airport in final read out and interpretation. 

Much of the hardware is of unique construction. Tracor Sciences and Systems will require the better part of a year to 
manufacture and install the equipment under rigid Airport performance specifications. 

The San Francisco International Airport Noise Monitoring System will be the latest development in the noise monitoring 
field and will enable the Airport to quantitatively measure noise produced by arriving and departing aircraft determining 
their compliance with the absolute noise limits established by the California Noise Standards. 



Q WHAT STEPS DOES SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT TAKE TO MINIMIZE AIRCRAFT NOISE? 

A To help alleviate the problem of objectionable aircraft noise San Francisco International Airport has: 

• Established a Sound Abatement Center to institute and encourage sound abatement 
programs with the FAA and airlines. 

• Encouraged aircraft engine retrofitting programs by airlines. 

• Limited the use of certain runways. 

• Altered take-off and landing approach patterns? 

• Restricted engine run-ups as to location and hours. 

Q WHAT ARE THE FUNCTIONS, ACTIONS AND RESULTS OF ESTABLISHING THE SFIA SOUND ABATEMENT 
CENTER? i 

A SOUND ABATEMENT: An enormous effort to control aircraft noise near airports has occupied many of the best 
engineering minds in the aircraft and air transportation industries for years and many millions of dollars have been 




TAKE-OFFS THAT AVOID 
RESIDENTIAL AREAS. A ma- 
jor factor in keeping the jet 
noise annoyance to a minimum 
is the use of preferential run- 
ways when weather conditions 
permit. The average runway us- 
age over a year's period on a 
percentage basis, clearly shows 
that more than two-thirds of all 
jet aircraft take-offs are over 
water and avoid residential areas. 



JET ENGINE TESTS requiring 
high speed run-ups are conduct- 
ed at a prescribed point of San 
Francisco International Airport 
nearly two miles from the clos- 
est dwelling. This procedure aids 
greatly in reducing possible jet 
sound nuisance to adjacent 
areas. 



▲ AIRPORT NOISE 
MONITOR STATION 




spent in the search for answers. Airlines, federal agencies, airports and pilots have, from the start of the jet age, 
combined their best talents in an unending endeavor to find better methods of minimizing jet noise over communities 
adjacent to airports. Aircraft manufacturers, working with the airlines and federal agencies, have developed 
constantly improved jetliners with quieter engines which have eased the airport noise situation considerably. 

SOUND ABATEMENT CENTER: With the coming of the jet age in 1960, several communities surrounding San 
Francisco International Airport were subjected to a new noise from overflying jets. To improve the jet noise 
situation, the San Francisco International Airport Sound Abatement Center was organized with membership from all 
airlines, the Air Transport Association, the Air Line Pilots Association, San Francisco International Airport, and the 
Airports Commission, City and County of San Francisco. During the past eleven years, the Center has taken 
significant steps in reducing jet noise, resulting in Airport neighbors having less annoyance from aircraft noise than 
those in the vicinity of many other major airports. Telephone 589-3100 to reach the Center for information relative 
to aircraft noise. 

PREFERENTIAL RUNWAY SYSTEM: The Sound Abatement Center and the Federal Aviation Administration have 
developed a preferential runway system to avoid takeoffs and landings over inhabited areas whenever wind and 
weather conditions permit. As a result, over 98% of jet landings at San Francisco International Airport are made from 
over San Francisco Bay. Annually, more than two-thirds of takeoffs, under the preferential runway system, are made 
over water, while less than one-third are over populated areas. 

SOUND ABATEMENT FLIGHT PROCEDURES: Guided by Sound Abatement Center recommendations, and with 
the cooperation of the airlines and their pilots, aircraft now take off from San Francisco lntoin.ition.il Aupoit 
utilizing refined procedures of engine and flap settings designed to minimize the jet noise over neighboring 
communities. Additionally, a shoreline departure has been initiated which takes aircraft away from local 
communities. During visual approach weather, a modified San Mateo Bridge approach is used to alleviate noise. 

RUNWAY LENGTHENING: Over $9 million has been expended by the San Francisco Airports Commission for thfl 
extension of Runway 28R, thus making it possible for jets to achieve higher altitude on takeoffs over neighboring 
communities with resultant reductions in jet noise. 

MAINTENANCE NOISE: The Sound Abatement Center has arranged for a curfew on maintenance noise benvtvn Id 
p.m. and 7 a.m. If between these hours an emergency makes it necessary to run tests on jet engines, the airlines take 
aircraft out to a runup pad located some two miles from the nearest residence, with jet exhaust oriented out over the 
bay. 



GARAGE 



Closest to Terminals: The Garage provides the 
only indoor parking available at the Airport. 



TERMINAL & PARKING 
MAP 

ECONOMY PARKING 




Avoid heavy traffic - easy entry. Lowest rates 
available. Free continuous shuttle service from 
your car to any Terminal. Use "Airport Shops" 
turn-off from U.S. 101. 



CURRENT AUTHORIZED PARKING RATES 



HOURS 
Over Less Than 


Garage* 
Rate 




Parking 
Lots Rate 


1 


$ .50 




$ .50 


1 2 


1.00 




1.00 


2 3 


1.50 




1.00 


3 4 


2.00 




1.00 


4 5 


2.50 




1.00 


5 6 


3.00 




1.00 


6 7 


3.50 




1.00 


7 8 


4.00 




1.00 


8 9 


4.00 




1.25 


9 10 


4.00 




1.25 


10 11 


4.00 




1.50 


11 12 


4.00 




1.50 


12 13 


4.00 




1.75 


13 14 


4.00 




1.75 


14 15 


4.00 




2.00 


15 16 


4.00 




2.00 


16 17 


4.00 




2.25 


17 18 


4.00 




2.25 


18 19 


4.00 




2.50 


19 20 


4.00 




2.50 


20 21 


4.00 




2.50 


21 22 


4.00 




2.50 


22 23 


4.00 




2.50 


23 24" 


*4.00 




*2.50 



*Over 24 hours: Additional hours to be computed 
on the above schedule. 

**Add $3.00 to garage charges for valet service. 



PARKING 
TIPS 

In accordance with recent Federal Aviation 
requirements, all boarding passengers must 
submit to a search of all hand carried luggage 
and walk through a security device. It is sug- 
gested that all departing passengers arrive at 
least 60 minutes prior to scheduled departure 
time. 

Schedule additional time for travel to and 
from the Airport, particularly at the begin- 
ning and end of the holiday periods, when 
traffic congestion is at its peak. 

When driving to pick up incoming passengers, 
plan to arrive in front of the terminal at least 
30 minutes after the flight's arrival to allow 
for baggage collection. 

We suggest you utilize the convenient Shut- 
tle Bus System during peak travel periods. 

Don't leave valuables in car — 24 hour 
lockers at all Terminals. 



Lock car — note location on ticket, 
ticket with you. 



Take 



NO WALKING OR CARRYING YOUR BAGS 

CONTINUOUS FREE SHUTTLE BUS SERVICE 
FROM YOUR CAR TO ANY TERMINAL DOOR 



PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION SCHEDULED SERVICE 



AIRPORT LIMOUSINE SERVICE 



AIRPORTER COACH SCHEDULE 



INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT TO: 

San Francisco $22.00 

San Jose 32.00 

Redwood City 28.00 

San Mateo 28.00 

Oakland (via San Francisco) 32.00 

San Rafael 36.00 

(Available on call 24 hours-a-day. Arrival level — South 
& Central Terminals) 

GREYHOUND BUS 
INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT TO: 

San Francisco (7th & Mission Sts.) $1.00 

San Jose 2.05 

Redwood City 1 .00 

San Mateo 85 

Oakland (via San Francisco) 1 .55 

San Rafael (change at San Francisco) 2.08 

(Bus stops — Arrival level between Central & South 
Terminals; Road R-16 between Hilton Inn and entrance 
to Pan Am lot.) 

TAXI 

(All fares approximate dependent on waiting time and 
specific destination) 

INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT TO: 

San Francisco $13.00 

San Jose . . . 41.00 

Redwood City 11.00 

San Mateo 7.50 

Oakland 22.50 

(Arrival level — South & Central Terminals) 
AIRPORTER COACH SERVICE 



INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT TO: 

San Francisco 

(O'Farrell & Taylor Sts. -Treasure Island) .... $1.15 

San Jose 2.75 

Redwood City 1 .35 

San Mateo 80 

Oakland 

(via Treasure Island & Oakland Army Base) ... 1.25 
(Arrival level — South & Central Terminals) 



CHILD 
(5-11) 

$.60 
% Fare 
1 /s Fare 
1 / 2 Fare 

K Fare 



SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT/DOWNTOWN 
SAN FRANCISCO AIRLINE TERMINAL 

(Taylor & O'Farrell) 
TO 

SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 



FROM: 

6:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. . . 
10:00 p.m. - 12:00 midnight 
12:00 midnight - 6:00 a.m. 



. Every 15 minutes 
. Every 30 minutes 
Scheduled according 
to flight departures 



12:00 midnight • 1 :00 a.m. ■ 2:00 a.m. • 3:30 a.m. 
4:10 a.m. ■ 5:30 a.m. 



FROM 

SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 



FROM: 

6:00 a.m.- 10:00 p.m. . . 
10:00 p.m. - 12:00 midnight 
12:00 midnight - 6:00 a.m. 



. . Every 15 minutes 
. . Every 30 minutes 
. Scheduled according 
to flight arrivals 



FROM 

SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 
TO 

DOWNTOWN OAKLANO 
AND INTERMEDIATE POINTS 

READ DOWN 





2 


4 


6 


TRIP NUMBER 




1 


3 


5 


Lv 


600a 


130p 


645p 


San Francisco 
Int'l Airport 


Ar 


800a 


345p 


845p 


Ar 




200p 


"715p 


Treasure Island 


Lv 




315p 


•715p 


Ar 


635a 


21 5p 


730p 


Oakland Army Base 
(Building #640! 


Lv 


715a 


300p 


810p 


Ar 


645a 


230p 


740p 


Oakland 
Cont'l Trailways 
20th & Telegraph 


Lv 


700a 


245p 


755p 



'Same bus discharges and accepts passengers at Treasure Island for 
San Franc/sco Airport. 



SAN JOSE MUNICIPAL AIRPORT/ 
SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 

VIA PENINSULA INTERMEDIATE STOPS 



TO: 

S. J. MUNI AIRPORT 
(read down) 



TO: 

S. F. INT'L AIRPORT 
Irntd up) 



16 



815a 
'820a 
'825a 
'830a 
'835a 
'840a 
•845a 
850a 
900a 
905a 
■915a 
"920a 
930a 
940a 



18 20 



400p 
405p 
410p 
415p 
420p 
425p 
430p 
435p 
445a 



800p 
805p 
'81 Op 
81 5p 
'820p 
'825p 
'830p 
835p 
845p 
850p 
'855p 
'900p 
305p 
915p 



TRIP NUMBER 



S.F. Int'l Airport 
Burlingame (1) 
San Mateo 111 
Belmont (II 
San Carlos 1 1 1 
Redwood City 111 
Menlo Park 111 
Palo Alto-Card. 
Palo Alto-Rickey 
Mountain View 
Sunnyvale 
Santa Clara 
S.J. Muni Airport 
Son Jos* 



17 



1200n 



1155a '540p 



1 150a 
1 145o 



I 1 411.1 



1135a 
1130a 
1125a 
1115a 
1 1 10a 
1100a 
1055a 
1045a 
1035. 



19 



545p 



535p 
530p 



520p 
515p 
510p 
500p 



21 



1055p 
1050p 
104 bp 
1040p 
1035p 
103Op 
1025p 
lOTOp 
lOlOp 
lOObp 
9bbp 
950p 
940p 
93Qp 



Quoted fares subject to change - Check with carrier 



*TERMINAL AREA. Included in 
this category are the terminal build- 
ings themselves and the supporting 
ground transportation system. The 
new facilities will allow full utiliza- 
tion of wide-bodied aircraft with 
attendant reductions in numbers of 
flights needed to handle 31 million 
passengers per year. This latter fact 
is the basis for the A BAG projec- 
tion of less noise pollution in 1985 
than in 1970. 

*AIRSIDE AREA. Comprises the im- 
provement of runways, taxiway 
systems and aprons designed to in- 
sure greater safety and efficiency of 
operation for the new, larger air- 
craft. Hi-speed exit taxiways and 
taxiway lighting are included, along 
with a special Noise Monitoring Pro- 
gram that will develop data from 
which further noise abatement pro- 
cedures and systems can be de- 
veloped. 

* LANDSIDE AREA. These projects, 
providing support facilities for the 
activities of the Airport, consist of 
Landside Facilities and Airport Ser- 
vice Facilities. 

SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT GROWTH. In 1966, in an effort to establish a base for future planning, 
the management of San Francisco International Airport undertook studies of then-current and anticipated air travel. Early 
predictions of 16 to 18 million air passengers annually were quickly and dramatically outdated with the advent of 
wide-bodied jets and an unpecedented growth in air travel. 

On short order a master plan was created, and implemented by the Airport's Division of Planning and Development, which 
was charged with the responsibility of developing a suitable expansion program. 

San Francisco Airport Architects, a joint venture of John Carl Warnecke & Associates and Dreyfuss & Blackford, was 
retained to develop the plan, and in 1968, was awarded a contract for architectural and engineering services for designing 
six satellite boarding areas, a new North Terminal building, a South Terminal addition to receive international arrivals, 
roads, utilities and support facilities. 

During the same period, beginning in 1967, the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), through its Regional 
Airport System Study Committee, undertook an in-depth study seeking solutions to the proliferating problems facing Bay 
Area airports. Problems brought about by growth and by subsequent strain on airport facilities. 

While conducting this searching study, the ABAG Committee diligently explored every facet of airport problems. A 
principal concern was to find ways to minimize the impact which needed changes might have upon the environment. 
Technical studies were conducted over a wide range of subjects, including access and capacity requirements, environmental 
and economic aspects and a number of special subjects dealing with interrelationships with other regions, vertical and short 
take-off and landing aircraft, and airport ownership. Many public hearings were held to elicit a solid and meaningful public 
reaction. The study resulted in a region-wide plan encompassing the entire San Francisco Bay Area. 

An Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for the proposed development program of San Francisco International Airport 
was prepared and thoroughly aired in both San Francisco and San Mateo counties, as well as before the San Mateo Airport 
Land Use Committee and the San Mateo Planning Commission. 

On May 1, 1973, the Airports Commission certified the completeness and adopted the final EIR forwarding it to the 
Board of Supervisors, City and County of San Francisco. On June 4, 1973, the Board of Supervisors referred the Airport 
Development Program EIR to the City Planning Department, which in turn prepared a revised EIR, held public hearings 
and adopted the final report on October 18, 1973. Following additional public hearings, the Board of Supervisors, City 
and County of San Francisco, adopted the final EIR on December 26, 1973. 

San Francisco International Airport is proceeding with the next phase of the Development Program — the construction of 
the North Terminal and additions to the Airport Garage — which, when completed, will alleviate the present extreme 
congestion now being experienced in the terminal buildings, roadways and supporting ground transportation systems. 



FUTURE PLANS FOR 
SAN FRANCISCO 
INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 





A PERSONAL MESSAGE 
FROM THE DIRECTOR 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 
INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 



San Francisco International Airport has embarked on an extensive program to modernize, improve and develop our 
passenger terminals and certain support facilities. The requirement to develop further and modernize the airport terminals 
is based on normal growth of passenger traffic which is forecast for the next decade. Part of an orderly and compatible 
regional Bay Area Airport System Plan the program provides the basis for planning and future development of SFIA. 

From a practical standpoint, the requirement to expand the SFIA passenger terminal complex and support facilities is 
already upon us. The 1973-74 traffic figure of 17.1 million exceeds the design level of the present facilities and indicates a 
continued growth of approximately 10 percent annually. The Airports Commission must go forward with a program to 
alleviate the existing passenger and motor vehicle congestion within the terminal complex and provide a suitable, 
convenient airport facility to the traveling public. 

The program we have adopted has been carefully developed with great regard to the Airport's obligations to the people of 
San Francisco and the San Francisco Bay Area. 

Environmentally, the line will be held and reduced on scheduled aircraft movements by using quieter, wide-bodied jets 
with increased passenger capacities. We are creating a master instrument runway of virtually 12,000 feet which will permit 
traffic routing programs specifically designed to reduce aircraft noise during take-off and landing procedures. 

Passenger and motor vehicle congestion within the terminal complex will be relieved when the new north terminal and 
attendant boarding areas now under construction are completed. The existing garage is being doubled in size while 
short-term, close-in parking is being provided close to the terminal roadway. 

The present inadequate boarding areas and piers are being replaced to accommodate the new wide-bodied jets. Our 
international passenger arrival and departure rotunda has been updated to provide San Francisco with the proper 
introduction point for those visiting Our Nation and the City. 

Major accomplishments in the near future will also include installation of the San Francisco International Airport Noise 
Monitoring System, which will permit the Airport to analyze qualitatively noise created by departing and arriving aircraft 
determining their compliance with the California Noise Standards. Completion of the $9 million Industrial Waste Water 
Treatment System will make the Airport's Water Quality Control System the first in the San Francisco Bay Area capable 
of complying with the ever more stringent requirements and standards of the California Water Quality Control Board. 

These projects are all designed to provide air travelers with a total-service, compact and modern airport facility, while 
minimizing impact on our environment. 

No additional property will be acquired by SFIA. Our development program must be accomplished within the present 
terminal complex area, making the task difficult to plan and program. As Director of Airports, it is my responsibility to 
design and complete the modernization of SFIA with a minimum of inconvenience to travelers. The program must be 
phased over a period of time to preclude interuption of operations. A comprehensive information program to alert the 
public of impending construction and changes is also required. 

Realizing that the end product will be a compact, modern and convenient airport of the future, I solicit your 
understanding and indulgence during construction, and appreciate your patience and support. 



Sincerely, 




William J. Dwyer 
Director of Airports 



SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 
415 / 761 -0800 




Knowing of your interest in San Francisco International Airport, 
we trust this revised copy of PACTS, Questions and Answers about 
San Francisco International Airport will prove useful to you. 

If you have any questions regarding the contents of this booklet, 
please let me know. 




Warren D. Hanson 

Public Relations Officer.